David Hill Photography

This is the shot that I captured using the one strobe and reflector
Mar 1

This is the shot that I captured using the one strobe and reflector

One light and reflector setup for a portfolio shoot in an alley on Lewiston, Maine
Mar 1

One light and reflector setup for a portfolio shoot in an alley on Lewiston, Maine

Runs on Reputation on Flickr.Have I mentioned that I love rust?Via Flickr:
1953 Buick Special
Sanford, Maine
Sep 6

Runs on Reputation on Flickr.

Have I mentioned that I love rust?
Via Flickr:
1953 Buick Special
Sanford, Maine

Reunited on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Doors from a 1957 Chevy Bel Air
The epitome of the American classic car
Aug 27

Reunited on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Doors from a 1957 Chevy Bel Air

The epitome of the American classic car

Layers on Flickr.Via Flickr:
1950 Oldsmobile Futuramic 88
Sanford, Maine
more pitted chrome love
Aug 25

Layers on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
1950 Oldsmobile Futuramic 88
Sanford, Maine

more pitted chrome love

No Stopping the Rust on Flickr.Via Flickr:
1951 Ford CustomDeluxe
North Berwick, Maine
I love the texture of the pitting on old chrome.
Aug 25

No Stopping the Rust on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
1951 Ford CustomDeluxe
North Berwick, Maine

I love the texture of the pitting on old chrome.

Man Made Lake on Flickr.Via Flickr:
1962 Chevrolet C-40 at an abandoned farm in Scarborough, Maine
Aug 17

Man Made Lake on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
1962 Chevrolet C-40 at an abandoned farm in Scarborough, Maine

3/4 Ton Trellis on Flickr.I love when nature and the creations of man become oneVia Flickr:
1962 Chevrolet C-40
Scarborough, Maine
Aug 16

3/4 Ton Trellis on Flickr.

I love when nature and the creations of man become one

Via Flickr:
1962 Chevrolet C-40
Scarborough, Maine

The Process-  When I am creating my art, it isn’t as simple as pointing and shooting. First, of course, I have to find the art. Once I find it, I need to determine how my vision is going to work with what I have found and it’s surroundings. Then, there are the technical considerations. Shutter speed, f-stop, what to focus on, whether to use flash or not and format. Do I want it to be color, black and white, HDR, or a combination of two or more? Once I’ve figured that out, then I get to take some pictures.
I almost never take just one picture of a subject. In the contact sheet for the photograph “What Light Through Yonder Window” that accompanies this article, there are twelve images. I actually shot fourteen, but left two of them out for symmetry reasons. The only camera setting I changed for any of the shots was shutter speed. In some, I physically moved the camera and tripod an inch or two, and in others I either moved the flash or the angle of the flash slightly. The slightest alterations can make the difference between a photo that I will edit and publish versus one that will never be seen again.
Once I find the image that I want, I do some simple editing in Photoshop CS5. I shoot in NEF (Nikon’s version of RAW) so that I have complete control over the photo. I will correct the white balance, if needed (I always leave the camera in auto white balance, even though it’s not exact). I do some adjustments to the saturation and vibrance of the shot, and very often I will also decrease the saturation of the green, especially for shots taken in the summertime. Once I have finished that, I will save it as an uncompressed TIF file, so that I retain all the information. Every time that you make a change to a JPG and save, it compresses itself again, leading to a loss of information each time you save.
Now that I have my archive image to work from, I create a JPG that I crop to 8X10, place my copyright watermark on it and post to facebook, flickr, tumblr and my shop on etsy. I also create a smaller JPG to add to my website. During the editing process I am usually working on a title for the piece. I try to incoporate a little humor whenever I can.
I truly enjoy sharing my art and seeing the comments people leave. Feel free to download any of the images that I post to use as wallpaper or as your desktop.
Aug 14

The Process-  When I am creating my art, it isn’t as simple as pointing and shooting. First, of course, I have to find the art. Once I find it, I need to determine how my vision is going to work with what I have found and it’s surroundings. Then, there are the technical considerations. Shutter speed, f-stop, what to focus on, whether to use flash or not and format. Do I want it to be color, black and white, HDR, or a combination of two or more? Once I’ve figured that out, then I get to take some pictures.

I almost never take just one picture of a subject. In the contact sheet for the photograph “What Light Through Yonder Window” that accompanies this article, there are twelve images. I actually shot fourteen, but left two of them out for symmetry reasons. The only camera setting I changed for any of the shots was shutter speed. In some, I physically moved the camera and tripod an inch or two, and in others I either moved the flash or the angle of the flash slightly. The slightest alterations can make the difference between a photo that I will edit and publish versus one that will never be seen again.

Once I find the image that I want, I do some simple editing in Photoshop CS5. I shoot in NEF (Nikon’s version of RAW) so that I have complete control over the photo. I will correct the white balance, if needed (I always leave the camera in auto white balance, even though it’s not exact). I do some adjustments to the saturation and vibrance of the shot, and very often I will also decrease the saturation of the green, especially for shots taken in the summertime. Once I have finished that, I will save it as an uncompressed TIF file, so that I retain all the information. Every time that you make a change to a JPG and save, it compresses itself again, leading to a loss of information each time you save.

Now that I have my archive image to work from, I create a JPG that I crop to 8X10, place my copyright watermark on it and post to facebook, flickr, tumblr and my shop on etsy. I also create a smaller JPG to add to my website. During the editing process I am usually working on a title for the piece. I try to incoporate a little humor whenever I can.

I truly enjoy sharing my art and seeing the comments people leave. Feel free to download any of the images that I post to use as wallpaper or as your desktop.

Deserted Island on Flickr.
Vacant service station in Auburn, Maine
This photo is composed of four separate shots merged in to one to give the “fisheye” look
Aug 12

Deserted Island on Flickr.

Vacant service station in Auburn, Maine

This photo is composed of four separate shots merged in to one to give the “fisheye” look